The Last (Or First) Time

I’m kind of in a hurry right now, so I could probably do a better job on this… but, I’m kind of in a hurry with this blog in general lately so I’m just going to go with it. This is a parody of that “The Last Time” poem for parents that’s been going around Facebook lately. It’s called, “The Last (Or First) Time.” it’s about OCD, and I originally meant for it to be funny, but it’s kind of funny and sad… but mostly I intended it to be funny.

The Last (Or First) Time

From the moment you realize you have OCD,

you will never be the same.

You might long for the person you were before,

When you had freedom and time,

And nothing in particular to worry about.

Or you may not remember not worrying at all.

You will know tiredness like you never knew it before,

And days will run into days that are exactly the same,

Full of counting and tapping,

Ruminating and crying,

Repeating things over and over,

It might seem like a never-ending cycle.

But don’t forget…

You never know exactly how many times any one thing will happen.

There will come a time when you will feed your baby

for the second or third time.

They will fall asleep on you after a long day

And it will be the fourth or fifth time you ever hold your

sleeping child.

One day you will carry them on your hip.

then set them down,

And pick them up that way again nine times to make it even.

Then wonder whether you should count picking them up and putting them down as “one” or “two.”

You will scrub their hair in the bath one night

And from that day on they will want to bathe alone.

Because you made them wash their hair four extra times.

They will not hold your hand to cross the road,

Not because of germs, but because if they touched your hand

You would have to touch their other hand 2 times.

And then repeat it once so it makes 4.

(But not just do it 4 times in the first place, because that’s different. it has to be two sets of two.)

They will creep into your room at midnight for cuddles,

And because it’s 12 AM and AM seems like an odd number and PM seems like an even number

It’s not OK to do anything at 12 AM.

1 AM is OK because 1 is an odd number and AM + odd number = even number.

It doesn’t have to make sense; it just feels right.

One afternoon you will sing “the wheels on the bus”

and do all the actions,

Then never sing them that song again.

Because the number of syllables in the title adds up to an odd number.

They will kiss you goodbye at the school gate,

The next day they will kiss you goodbye two times because the first time didn’t feel right.

You don’t always have to add up all the totals to be even, it just depends on how it feels.

You will read a final bedtime story and wipe your last dirty face.

They will one day run to you with arms raised,

for the third time. Or maybe it’s the fourth. Or the fifth.

You will send them back across the playground to run towards you again and count the number of steps they take while running, and maybe that will make it better.

The thing is, you won’t even know how many times all of these things happened

Until you spend your entire life counting, and even then,

You won’t be able to account for the times you were too young to have memories,

And can’t be sure whether you in some way knew how to count things back then.

So while you are living in these times,

Remember there are only so many of them and

when they are gone,

you will yearn for just one more day of them.

So you can stop counting.

The “30 Things” Post

Apparently there’s this thing going around now, where you post 30 things about your invisible illness that others may not know. What else may you not know? I’m up late, and very tired right now, but always very tired as I’m taking care of a newborn lately. Anyway, you can thank invisibleillnessweek.com for this post and here’s the beginning of this whole trend, also apparently.

Note: I could’ve made this about OCD, chronic tic disorder, OR hypothyroidism. Or idiopathic/immune (depending on which doctor you ask) thrombocytopenic purpura. But in the interest of simplicity, and not making anyone pronounce any new words, I picked OCD. Will I do others in the future? If I get bored, maybe.

30 Things About My Invisible Illness You May Not Know

1. The illness I live with is: Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder
2. I was diagnosed with it in the year: 2013
3. But I had symptoms since: As long as I can remember.
4. The biggest adjustment I’ve had to make is: Realizing that my brain frequently tells me something is wrong when it’s not.
5. Most people assume: That OCD just means I like having things neat and am particular.
6. The hardest part about mornings are: That I often wake up immediately thinking about something that really bothered me from yesterday, which I had tried to stop thinking about.
7. My favorite medical TV show is: Um… I don’t really have one. I’ve seen a few episodes of House that I liked, but I doubt there is such a thing as a medically accurate medical TV show, unless it’s a documentary of some kind, in which case it’s probably not a show. This was a really long answer. Anyway, medicine is a strong interest of mine so I have a feeling the inaccuracies in popular dramas would frustrate me (though this would actually have nothing to do with my OCD). I just made the long answer even longer!
8. A gadget I couldn’t live without is: My iPad mini, but only because it’s the last present my dad got for me before he died.
9. The hardest part about nights are: Trying to stop thinking about everything that’s been bothering me.
10. Each day I take 2 pills & vitamins. (No comments, please)
10.5: I really really wanted to add a comment to #10. And that is, I take 0 pills & vitamins that have anything to do with treating my OCD.
11. Regarding alternative treatments I: This depends on what you mean by “alternative.” If you mean homeopathy or seeing a chiropractor, no. But I am open to lots of other things. I am a skeptic, and I believe in modern medicine and science.
12. If I had to choose between an invisible illness or visible I would choose: Visible, because then I don’t have to explain to people what is wrong. As much. Maybe.
13. Regarding working and career: Fortunately, my OCD has not interfered much with this, except for sometimes making me tired from being up all night being upset about something for nights on end.
14. People would be surprised to know: That me being detail-oriented and meticulous is probably a completely different facet of my personality unrelated to my OCD.
15. The hardest thing to accept about my new reality has been: Actually, being diagnosed was a big relief for me, and I think I faced more struggles when I didn’t know or tried to hide my problems. Since I’ve most likely had OCD my whole life, if this question means a contrast between life before OCD and life after, I really can’t answer that.
16. Something I never thought I could do with my illness that I did was: Um… stopped thinking about something that bothers me? Because that’s pretty much simultaneously the most stupid and simple-sounding accomplishment yet also the most difficult one. Raising children is pretty tough, though.
17. The commercials about my illness: I don’t really see any.
18. Something I really miss doing since I was diagnosed is: Worrying? No, I don’t miss worrying, plus I still do it anyway. Otherwise I do the same stuff.
19. It was really hard to have to give up: A feeling of trust in my poorly wired instincts.
20. A new hobby I have taken up since my diagnosis is: Blogging about my diagnosis.
21. If I could have one day of feeling normal again I would: Since I’ve always had OCD, I always feel normal. 😦 But um… I would probably accomplish a LOT more if I didn’t have to spend so much energy trying to ignore my own thoughts. So I would probably just go out and do a lot of stuff.
22. My illness has taught me: That I have the power to ruin my life by creating problems because I’m worried that they will exist.
23. Want to know a secret? One thing people say that gets under my skin is: That I’m worrying about something “little” or “not a big deal.” If I felt like it wasn’t a big deal, why would I be worried about it? Oh, thanks, that thing I thought was a big deal is suddenly not a big deal just because you said so without stating any other reasons or even trying to find out why I think it’s important! Thanks!
24. But I love it when people: Help me restructure my own thoughts instead of rebuilding them for me. For example: “Do you REALLY think washing your hands again will make you feel finally sure that they are clean, or will you maybe just want to do it again in five minutes?” versus “You’re worrying too much! Stop washing your hands all the time! Why are you making a big deal out of nothing?!”
25. My favorite motto, scripture, quote that gets me through tough times is: Um… I need to find one. I do think being able to laugh in the face of adversity is important, though. (Being able to laugh at yourself and your situation. Not like… laughing cruelly at your enemies. That’s not what I mean.)
26. When someone is diagnosed I’d like to tell them: To expect people to make a bunch of assumptions and give nonsense advice. Constantly. And just to be pleasantly surprised when it doesn’t happen.
27. Something that has surprised me about living with an illness is: I can’t really answer this because I’ve probably always had OCD.
28. The nicest thing someone did for me when I wasn’t feeling well was: Treated me as though my thoughts, feelings, and concerns were valid and important.
29. I’m involved with Invisible Illness Week because: I have an invisible illness, I’m bored, and need to update my blog.
30. The fact that you read this list makes me feel: Special?

What’s OCD and What Isn’t

To help people understand OCD a little better, here are some simple OCD and non-OCD examples.

Not OCD = washing your hands frequently.

OCD = washing your hands because you looked at a bottle of poison, and worry that poison particles might have floated onto your hands.

Not OCD = keeping a clean house, and being tidy to a fault.

OCD = cleaning your house even though you don’t want to, because of an object that touched something that touched something that touched something else that might have touched something dirty months ago that has since been cleaned, and now all of these objects are probably contaminated.

Not OCD = being conscious and careful about germs.

OCD = worrying that germs can travel in ways they actually don’t, or believing that certain numbers or colors are associated with the spread of germs (i.e. “If I looked at something blue/the number X, I’ll probably get sick”).

Not OCD = enjoying routines and following rules.

OCD = following routines and rules that you hate because you feel like if you don’t, something bad will happen.

Not OCD = keeping objects straight and neat.

OCD = readjusting an object even though you know it probably is straight, because it just doesn’t feel right.

It’s impossible to diagnose OCD based on one symptom alone and as you can see, the problem has less to do with being clean or orderly and more to do with being unable to tolerate even a small amount of uncertainty. People with OCD are more aware and afraid of uncertainty than other people. We obsess over something that might happen as though it probably will, or already has happened. We do this not because we’re uptight or even generally excessive worriers, but because our brains tell us something is wrong. It’s the same feeling we get when something actually is wrong, like when we get injured or make a serious mistake, so it’s the most difficult feeling in the world to ignore — but we must learn to ignore it. That’s why beating OCD is so difficult.

OCD isn’t something that inspires us to be cleaner, neater, and more efficient in our lives; it’s something that holds us back, because it means our brains are telling us we have to deal with problems that don’t even exist. Certainly, people with OCD can be more detail-oriented, good at focusing, and observant — and if so, we can learn to use those powers to our advantage. But those things are not the essence of OCD, and not the core of our problem.

Will It Be OK: Greatest Hits

Upon publishing my last entry to WordPress, I found out it was my 100th post. So in honor of 100 posts on this OCD and Tourette’s weblog started almost one year ago, or rather in honor of 101 posts now, I present to you: The Best of “Will It Be OK.” The following is a list of hyperlinks to what I feel have been my best — or most memorable — posts throughout this blog’s short life. These picks do not necessarily reflect what I think is my best writing, but also sometimes what links to the most interesting material or important points.

OCD Meme: This is an image post, and I link to it because I’m proud that I made this meme myself. It describes the way different parts of society may sometimes view OCD, fused with humor. This image is featured on my “About” page along with a Tourette’s (non-meme, non-humorous) image which I did not make myself.

Monk And The Lamp: Probably should’ve been titled, “Mr. Monk And The Lamp.” In this “episode” I pick apart an episode of Monk and how that particular story doesn’t portray OCD accurately. That being said, Monk is a great show, and I’ve watched it frequently. At times it does accurately represent OCD — just not always.

PANDAS: Now that I’ve lost my father, I especially treasure this one because my sense of humor therein reminds me so much of his. I feel like he was kind of writing through me with this post. Not that I’m the greatest comedian, but I don’t get many chances on this blog to be humorous, so it was a refreshing change. Also, Pediatric Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorders Associated with Streptococcus is a super interesting topic! More research needs to be done on this controversial issue.

Link Time: Contains links to several very informative videos (not mine) about OCD and Tourette’s syndrome. If you don’t know much, this is a great place to start!

“The Spectrum”: Autism is not the only spectrum.

Tourette’s Brains = Greater Motor Control?: Do people with Tourette’s syndrome have greater motor control? Are they less likely to respond reflexively?

You Might Have OCD If…: While I was kidding when I wrote this, it’s probably half-true!

Alphabet Soup Syndrome: When you have so many disorders that it’s like, OCDTSASADHDADDALKFLKSJDFKJDF.

Game Illustrates Inner Struggle of Tourette’s: A videogame to help people understand Tourette’s syndrome? Sweet!

Tourettic OCD: It’s not alphabet soup, but we’re getting there.

Dude, I Know You’re OCD…: Another image post. This one shatters a stereotype (albeit with another stereotype), and really cracks me up.

Dealing With Crises: Are people with high levels of anxiety, especially OCD, better equipped to deal with real emergencies than normal people?

Don’t Hate Me Because I Look Crazy: Insane or dangerous people don’t always look that way.

I Am Adam Lanza’s Mother’s Doctor’s 8th Cousin Twice Removed: Because someone in the blogosphere finally had to say that.

Easy Hand Washing Guide: Another humorous image post. What if the air was germy? Better wash your hands again.

The Boy Who Cried Wolf

If you have OCD, or tend to worry a lot for other reasons, you’re probably very familiar with the story of “The Boy Who Cried Wolf.” People around us will frequently remind us about it, after hearing our concerns. The things we worry about often seem small and insignificant to them, particularly if they are not especially devoted to us and to trying to understand (which I admit is probably hard to do). We should be warned, they say; because if we keep worrying or complaining about things that don’t matter, when there is a real problem, no one will know. Sadly, this can be true. But what people don’t understand is that those of us with OCD can’t help our false alarms. The famous fable is intended as a lesson for liars, but we are not liars; we have sudden feelings of apprehension. We don’t hallucinate, but we imagine problems that seem very real. And I hesitate to even call it imagination — I just can’t think of a better word. If it were imagination, we would have some control over it. The feelings really seem important to us. And the accusation that we are somehow as bad as a liar, prankster, or bully, for feelings we cannot help, only makes life more painful. Not only do we have feelings that are hard to understand and control, but we are made to feel like bad people for it.

When I get ready to go to sleep at night, and I’m tired, my brain assaults me with things to worry about. Whereas most people seem to have the reaction of: “Boy, I’m tired right now. I don’t have the energy to worry about anything. I better get some sleep and deal with these problems tomorrow,” my brain is the opposite; the more tired I am, the more I am not able to stop thinking about certain kinds of bad things that take root in my brain. It would be nice if I could only not stop thinking about problems that were important, solvable, or directly related to something going on in my life at the time — but they’re not. And once these things take root and get controlled by my OCD, it’s not impossible, but very difficult to put them out of my mind. “Just stop thinking about it?” “Why can’t you let anything go?” Because I’m forced not to — that’s why. It’s not a choice.

Neil Hilborn – OCD

Most of you have probably seen this by now. It’s been spreading around the internet like wildfire — which is a very good thing. It’s a spot-on testimony about heartbreak and OCD, and how they can become horribly entwined. I haven’t posted about it until now because, well, there’s just not much I can add to it. It’s brilliant, though, and anyone who hasn’t seen it yet definitely should take the time to. It’s a powerful 3 minutes.

I don’t want to blame all my relationship problems on OCD, but it certainly does make things a lot harder. It’s like you have a hard work-out already and someone just ups the speed on the treadmill without telling you — or something like that.

I’m struggling to find something else to say, but the only way I could is by going into a long, detailed personal history and while I could do that I’m just not in the mood right now, and there would probably not be sufficient benefit for my readers to outweigh the effort. My problem has always been that it never feels right, I never feel accepted, I always feel rejected, and even when I don’t ask for reassurance what I feel is acceptance of rejection, never that I’m not rejected. OK, maybe there have been occasional times that it felt OK, but they quickly pass. And you know what? When that is always the focus, it’s hard to solve or even identify any other problems that may be occurring.

My daughter is screaming at me right now because she can’t take her boots off (???), so it’s hard to put much thought into this.

I Missed Wordless Wednesday

Once upon a time, “Wordless Wednesday” was a thing. Then I started a blog. For a while I had lots of ideas for things to write about, but then I started to run out and posted cartoons for Wordless Wednesday. After a couple weeks of doing this, I realized I might continue the tradition. Until this week — I stopped. The End.

Seriously, I haven’t had much to write about. Writing about OCD, if one is not careful, can become very repetitive and monotonous — because OCD is very repetitive and monotonous. I don’t even realize how much me asking about the same thing over and over can annoy others, because I’m so used to thinking about the same thing over and over that it seems perfectly normal to me. So, I’m trying not to write about the same thing over and over — which admittedly I’ve been doing already, to an extent. I also can’t entirely avoid writing about things I’ve previously mentioned, so I’m trying to find a middle ground.

I’m still happy about seeing lots of positive OCD awareness promotion — images and words abound, more and more, telling us that OCD is not what we’ve previously believed; it’s not just about washing your hands, and it’s not just about being neat or perfectionistic. Lately I’ve struggled with wanting to quarantine parts of my car because I’ve seen ants crawl across a spot near there — so quarantining is the compulsion, and instead of cleaning that area, I don’t want to touch it.

We need to also not be selfish in our awareness promotion. Awareness and activism is important for all disorders and diseases, not just ones we’re affected by personally — but often the more rare the disorder, the more misunderstood and neglected it and its causes can be.